Posts Tagged ‘explaination’

Checking the sites your computer is connecting to in Windows

Have you noticed a sudden drop of your Internet speed? A possible explaination is that some nasty program is doing things behind your back. Whether it is spyware, malware or adware you might have a serious case of unauthorized traffic on your hands.

But don’t worry, it’s quite easy to get a list of your connections in Windows. Such a list may turn quite helpful and may help you find some unknown applications are using your bandwidth for their dirty bidding.

Naturally this list will be generated through the Command Prompt. First, open the Command Prompt under Administrator Mode. To do that, open the Start menu, type cmd in the search box:

Right-click on cmd.exe and select Run as administrator:

The command prompt will open:

Enter the following command:

netstat -fab 5 > connections.txt

Now, before we press Enter, let’s take a moment to look what exactly are we doing here. First of all netstat is a command that generates a lot of useful information about your network status. Additionally there are several options we can add to our netstat command, some of which are:

 -f – for displaying the full DNS name for hosts on the other side of each connection. This makes the generated data a lot easier to comprehend.

-a – to put it simply this stands for “all”. As in “all connections and listening ports”.

 -b – to output the name of the application making the connection.

Alternatively to -f you can use -n to display only IP addresses.

Naturally, “5” stands for how often do we want this information to be gathered. Finally, “> connections.txt” means that we want to output this information to connections.txt (so called piping).

So now that we now what we are doing, we can freely hit Enter.

Wait for a couple of minutes and press Ctrl + C to stop netstat. Now you can open connections.txt (which in our case is located in C:\Windows\System32  because we ran netstat from there) and see the activity of every application for the moment you started netstat, until you turned it off.

Note: This information may not be complete as we set netstat to update once in five seconds.

Note: This trick works on Windows 7 and Windows Vista. If you are still using Windows XP you need at least SP2.

 

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