Posts Tagged ‘apache webserver’

How to use mod_deflate in Apache to optimize site speed

On April 9-th 2010 Google announced that the load speed of a website will be a key component in the new page rank generation formula. As a professional server administrator I have decided to test our webserver performance if we will be able to fit the new rules and keep our page rank. Of course I was not seeing any particular issue with the site speed but in google webmaster tools I had a very scary message and graph of the site speed. Read the rest of this entry »

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Error establishing a database connection

Error establishing a database connection in WordPress is one of the worst errors you may get and in my opinion the hardest to troubleshoot as we all know that the developers of WordPress made it really hard for non experienced users to get some useful stuff from the logs. In this tutorial I will try to guide you how to troubleshoot this error and get your wordpress blog up and running once again.

I want to explain that what follows are general instructions how to proceed if you get this error. I will try to generalize the approach to find the root cause of the issue.

The prerequisites are you run the latest available version of WordPress, you use Apache webserver , and you use mysql database. That is pretty much 95% of all WordPress users so we hope to be helpful to majority of the users.

First and most important step is to find out if the username and password are working. All hosting companies offer phpmyadmin to test the connection to the database server. I will not cover instructions of how to do that as all hosting companies offer different control panels. The best advice if you do not know how to test the username and password is to call your hosting provider. The configuration settings about your database login credentials are stored in wp-config.php file. They look like this Read the rest of this entry »

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Setup Logrotate

Most Linux systems will come with am installed tool, logrotate, that rotates log files. Unless rotated, log files keep growing until they fill all the free space . Rotating them means copying them to a backup file and creating a new empty log. Backup logs are usually removed when they are to far out of date. Usually logrotate runs without any special configuration by the system administrator. Most of the times it is installed to run nightly as a cron job and each service you install, as a separate package, will also install a custom configuration file that tells logrotate how to rotate the log files for that application. Read the rest of this entry »

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